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Cover

HOLD YOUR NOSE

A COLLECTION

OF SANITARY SONGS

INTENDED FOR THE DISINFECTION

OF

DUBLIN CASTLE

_______________

Published at the Office of the ” WEEKLY NEWS,”

90 MIDDLE ABBEY STREET, DUBLIN

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1884
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PRICE ONE PENNY

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A VICEREGAL NOSEGAY :

CONTRIBUTED BY THE POETS

OF THE

“WEEKLY NEWS.”

No. 1.

A GERANIUM, SENT IN BY MR, J. H. RYAN,

THURLES.

I.

On a somewhat recent evening

Hearing angry shouts and shrill,

I, being curious, like my neighbours,

} With them hastened to Cork-hill,

There were many urchins yelling

Like a rookery of crows.

When I queried, ‘‘ What’s the trouble ?”

Cried an arab, ‘‘ Hold your nose !

Decent man, that’s Dublin Castle,

Where they live ‘ beneath the rose’ ;

If you’ve got a grain of wisdom

When you pass it hold your nose.”

II.

Holding hard my facial handle,

Much amazed, I asked again:

” What’s the cause of all this racket,

Please to tell me, slowly then ?”

And with great deliberation

He made answer: ‘‘ Now, suppose

You would take some friendly counsel,

Go your way and hold your nose.

I have said that’s Dublin Castle

Where they live ‘ beneath the rose’;

But if you’ve a grain of wisdom

Be advised and hold your nose.”

Ill.

I was ambling slowly onwards, .

My bewilderment complete,

When‘ ’midst sabres, guns, and bayonets,

Foxy Jack pranced up the street,

Cymbals, drums, and bugles playing

“This is how the money goes”;

‘‘Right you are,” I muttered inly,

Meanwhile holding tight my nose.

” Sure enough,” I grumbled crossly,

‘That’s the way the money goes”;

Don’t be rash,” replied that urchin,

‘Pass along and hold your nose.”

IV.

Pah ! the air was foul and reeky ;

I was growing faint and ill—

Tortured fancy never painted

Half the horrors of Cork-hill.

French and Bolton—pause and ponder,

Loyal folks—your gods be those !

Wirrasthrue ! Tel homme, tel maitre.

Blur an agurs, hould your nose.

This is gentle Earl Spencer,

And his firm supporters those ;

Aptly said, ‘ Like man, like master.”

Friendly counsel, ” Hold your nose ?

V.

Though dark clouds still dim the sunlight,

We have fallen on brighter days—

Praise to those who dared the danger

Hid in filthy, devious ways !

Oh! a debt beyond repaying

Ireland to O’Brien owes ;

Still when passing Cornwall Castle

were as well to hold your nose.

Cornwall Castle ! Cornwall Castle !

Where they live “ beneath the rose,”

Much I fear your days are numbered—

There goes Spencer ! Hold your nose !

________________

No. 2.

A PANSY, CONTRIBUTED BY “OSCAR.”

I

There is a spot in Dublin—perhaps you know it well—

‘Tis opposite the Castle gate, but, oh! it has a 

smell ;

A foul one, too, och wirrasthru ! for Erin pure and

mild—

For Erin of the saintly sons and maidens undefiled,

Chorus—

But hold your nose, and use your toes,

And like an arrow fly ;

Take care, don’t wait outside the gate

Whene’er you pass it by.

II.

Worse than the odour of the tree that spreads de-

struction round,

Worse than the stench of charnel house its fetid fumes

are found ;

Worse than the wind in torrid climes that desolates

the plain

Is the odour at the Castle gate that stupefies the

brain,

Chorus—

But hold your nose, and use your toes,

And like an arrow fly ;

Take care, don’t wait outside the gate

Whene’er you pass it by.

III.

They say that lime is very good to cleanse the foulest

air,

And acids, too, that doctors use, are good beyond com-

pare ;

Then whitewash all inside the wall, and use your

acids well—

Don’t let them out without a coat, for, phew ! they

have a smell,

Chorus—

But hold your nose, and use your toes,

And like an arrow fly ;

Take care, don’t wait outside the gate

Whene’er you pass it by.

____________

No. 3.

A SPRIG OF LAVENDER, BY J. M‘D., DROMOD,

I.

There’s a stronghold of the Saxon on Cork-hill—

Hold your nose !

Its foul odours all the Christian virtues kill—

Hold your nose!

Our fair city’s darkest blot,

Scene of many a fiendish plot,

As you near the noisome spot

Hold your nose !

II.

In a nauseous moral cesspool near the gate—

Hold your nose!

Countless filth-engendered vipers congregate—

Hold your nose!

And pollute our Irish air :

Shun it as the hydra’s lair,

But should business take you there

Hold your nose!

III.

Forget not ’tis the spawning ground of sin—

Hold your nose !

Remember all are lost who enter in—

Hold your nose !

Do not lightly venture nigh,

From its baneful shadow fly ;

As you pass it swiftly by

Hold your nose.

IV.

Were its grimy, blackened walls with tongues en-

dowed—

Hold your nose !

Every cranny, every stone would cry aloud,

“Hold your nose !”

There opiates strong and deep

Truth and justice lull to sleep,

Through the gates hell’s vapours creep—

Hold your nose !

V.

Lowest parasites’ and panderers’ resort—

Hold your nose !

Where the “ firm and gentle Spencer” keeps his court—

Hold your nose!

There, by corruption’s flood,

Upas plants unnumbered bud,

And the floors are stained with blood—

Hold your nose !

VI.

Moral reprobates and lepers throng his hall—

Hold your nose!

And prone before the shrine of Mammon fall—

Hold your nose!

Skilled in every knavish art,

Base of mind and black of heart,

Oh ! their souls are in the mart—

Hold your nose!

VII.

‘The Castle,” with its tenants, stands confessed—

Hold your nose!

A hideous cancer on our country’s breast—

Hold your nose !

There the vilest wins the prize,

While its strangled victims’ cries

Ascend and pierce the skies—

Hold your nose !

VIll.

Since O’Brien with a spirit strong and keen—

Hold your nose!

Has placed the odious den in quarantine—

Hold your nose! :

Evil things with hell allied

In its dark recesses hide :

Till ’tis cleansed and purified,

Hold your nose !

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No. 4.

A WALL-FLOWER, BY HENRY M‘ANALLY, OF

PARTICK, GLASGOW.

I,

The smell of Dublin Castle

Defiles the passing air,

So great is the corruption

That grows and lingers there,

Den of abomination,

Source of unnumbered woes,

When passing it, good people,

Be sure to hold your nose!

II,

Alas! the grimy Castle

Grows dirtier with time,

Still adding to its record

Of base and filthy crime.

Each day’s new revelation

Fresh light upon it throws—

When passing it, good people,

Be sure to hold your nose!

III.

The ghosts of dead men wander

Within its hateful walls ;

‘heir cry is, “Murder ! murder |”

Each voice for vengeance calls ;

The smell of Sodom rises

Upon each wind that blows—

When passing it, good people,

Be sure to hold your nose !

IV.

Let Spencer and Trevelyan

Enjoy the frightful place—

What shocks the rest of Europe

To them is no disgrace.

But while from Dublin Castle

The vile pollution flows,

When passing it, good people,

Be sure to hold your nose !

____________________

No. 5.

A FORGET-ME-NOT, BY “ROSS TREVOR.”

I.

There’s a tainted spot in Dublin quite convenient to

Cork-hill,

It was: foul and rotten years ago, “tis foul and rotten

still,

From poisoned gases rising there a public peril grows,

So if Fate should set you near it you had better hold

your nose.

When you pass it raise your elbow, and your

fingers tightly close

On that dainty nasal organ which is briefly

called your nose.

II.

In the backwoods of Columbia thrives the inoffensive

skunk,

But if you were asked to touch him, well I calculate

you’d funk,

And you’d think of flowery regions where the migno-

nette and rose

Load the breezes with those perfumes rare that fasci-

nate the nose ;

But the skunk is clean and wholesome, as upon

his way he goes :

To the offal in the Castle that makes each man

hold his nose.

Ill.

People say malignant vapours lie upon the Poddle’s

breast,

And that darling Anna Liffey carries on her wave the

pest.

True, perhaps; but sweet and fragrant seems each

river, as it flows,

To the mind when ’mid the odours which on Cork-hill

greet the nose.

And while Poyntz presides within it, arch-dis-

Spencer of our woes,

Not a child should pass the Castle without hold-

ing its small nose.

IV.

The Chinese with their stink-pots are in battle very

bold, (3)

And with these unsavory weapons they slay myriads

untold,

But they’d vanquish all creation, quickly rout their

bravest foes,

Were they armed with those vile vapours against

which we hold fast the nose.

Oh! the science of the chemist nought more

horrid can disclose

Than these fumes from Dublin Castle which

now make us hold the nose.

V.

If brave Erin’s noble rivers were all waters of Co-

logne,

Tf the scented streams of Araby were ours, and ours

alone,

And they washed the Castle’s basement till the cen-

tury would close,

Still, if George and John were reigning there, you’d

have to hold your nose.

Oh ! until the mass of rubbish lying there to

decompose

Shall be carted off, whoe’er goes by will have to

hold his nose.

______________________

No, 6. –

A TULIP, BY “ PHOENECIA.”

I.

Pray, honest folk, be mindful

Of the alien’s social pest

Which now defiles our city—

I mean the “Felon’s Nest.”

Should business bring you nigh it,

While the wind unkindly blows,

You’d better hurry by it

And firmly hold your nose!

The smell from it is trying,

All laws of health defying,

For disinfection crying,

So you’d better hold your nose !

II.

Within its slimy chambers

What loathsome spectres dwell !

Corruption, falsehood, bribery,

And crime as foul as hell ;

While in its secret dungeons

Poor victims decompose—

Each decent man that passes

Must surely hold his nose.

Now let us agitate it,

And rightly fumigate if,

Until we all abate it—

But meanwhile hold your nose !

III.

Methinks how must poor “Foxy”

Contrive to eat and drink

With George, the “English gentleman,”

‘Mid such a moral stink ;

But usage and the salary

Which yearly from it grows

May make it aromatic

To the autocratic nose.

But we shall not be stifled

That our pockets may be rifled ;

Too long with it we’ve trifled,

So now for manly blows !

(4)

No. 7.

A SPRIG OF MIGNONETTE, BY ‘‘ CLONTARF,”

I.

Passing round by Dublin Castle

I on yester evening saw

. At the gate a bobby sitting

With his baton in his paw.

I went o’er and said, ‘‘ Poor fellow,

Have you corns upon your toes ?”

But the Blue gave back for answer,

“* Hurry by and hold your nose !

Chorus—

Hurry by and hold your nose !

Hurry by and hold your nose !

Master Nick is in the Castle—

Hurry by and hold your nose!”

II.

“Friend,” he said, ‘‘in yonder palace

There’s distemper, fatal, dread—

Binns Trevelyan is in trouble,

Foxy Jack is sick in bed;

And I know of something rotten

Hidden there by Erin’s foes—

Oh ! the stench is diabolic,

Hurry by, and hold your nose,

Chorus—

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

Hurry by, and hold your nose !

There are lepers in the Castle—

Hurry by, and hold your nose !’

III.

I upraised my nasal organ,

And I felt a horrid smell

Coming from that den Satanic

Where the foes of freedom dwell!

Such an odour surely never

From the deep, black pit arose ;

“T’was no wonder bobby told me

Hurry by and-hold your nose, |

Chorus—

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

There’s a plague-spot in the Castle—

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

IV.

Soon I fled away in terror :

From that nasty, evil place,

Where base men are plotting ever

To destroy the Celtic race ;

_ And while rushing on I vowed me

That till life’s career would close

I’d remember well the warning,

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

Chorus—

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

, Hurry by, and hold your nose!

Where the Cork-hill rats are prowling

– Hurry by, and hold your nose!

V.

Now, to each true son of Erin .

Who will read my simple lay,

My advico is, in conclusion,

To remember what I say :

When you meet a swell official,

Dressed in gaudy Castle clothes,

To escape contamination

Hurry by, and hold your nose !

Chorus—

Hurry by, and hold your nose !

Hurry by, and hold your nose!

Oh! when passing Brimstone Castle

Hurry by, and hold your nose !

No. 8.

A SPRIG OF HAWTHORN FROM KILLARNEY.

I.

I’ve been up in Dublin lately

On a visit to a friend,

And I’ve seen its buildings stately

And its streets from end to end.

Need I say I was delighted

At the scenes that round me rose?—

. When my friend, somewhat excited,

Cried out quickly, ‘‘ Hold your nose !”

II.

‘‘ Friend, (in accents reprehensive),

‘* You’re,” said I, ** on joking bent;

Surely there is nought offensive

T’o a nose of keenest scent ?

Tn this place so grand and splendid

Everything in order flows,”

But my friend abruptly ended

) My remarks with ‘’ Hold your nose !”

III.

” You on hoaxing me are bent, sir,”

I replied He answered back,

” Don’t you know ’tis Earl Spencer—

Lately known as Foxy Jack—

Dwells herein ; but wait a minute :

Mark that crowd as on it goes.”

As J live there’s something in it—

Each one sings out, ” Hold your nose ” !

IV.

” What means this?” I cried in wonder;

“ Nought unclean could live, I’m sure,

In that noble castle yonder,

And the fields look fresh and pure.”

Quoth my friend, ‘* You’re simple, very ;

Stolid as the cawing crows

Down there ’midst the hills of Kerry,

Else like us you’d ‘ hold your nose,”

V.

‘Know you not famed Dublin Castle—

Den of infamy and sin,

Scene of shame and crime and wassail,

‘Fair without and foul within,’

Hotbed where each bitter evil

For our land luxuriant grows,

Haunt of ghost and ghoul and devil ?—

Now, my friend, just ‘hold your nose.’

VI.

” Here “tis said that Georgie Bolton

And his master, Johnny Poyntz,

Sights have seen so dread, revolting,

As to shiver all their joints ;

Poor Myles Joyce, by Marwood strangling

His avenging spirit shows,

In mid air before them dangling—

Ha! I see you ‘hold your nose.’

VII.

” But some chaps are undertaking

All the Castle’s crew to rout—

dee its walls already shaking ;

Soon we’ll see them all cleared out.

Good, O’Brien! Bravo, Healy !

‘ Break upon their dark repose !

Use your lingual weapons freely,

But remember—‘ Hold your nose !’

VIII.

” What a blessing for our nation

When the day all-glorious comes

That shall see the degradation

Of Red Spencer and his bums—

That shall see her rise victorious

O’er her mean, intriguing foes,

And her flag wave proudly o’er us:

Then we need not ‘ hold our nose ! ”

___________________

No. 9.

A BIT OF SWEETBRIAR, BY DENIS CAVANAGH,

MOUNTRATH.

I.

You tourists so gay who day after day

Pass through our fair city some pleasure to find,

Beware lest you chance, in escaping from France,

To meet a worse plague than you’re leaving behind,

‘here’s a house on Cork-hill where our rulers distil

A. poison that blights, wheresoever it goes ;

Should you pass by the gate, either early or late,

Don’t neglect the precaution of holding your nose,

Chorus—

Keep a hold of your nose—keep fast hold of your

nose

When you pass by that grim, gloomy chamber of

woes ;

For the air all around is the worst to be found—

So don’t offer to loosen the grip on your nose.

Il.

You peasants who come from your Western home

To escape for a week all the toils that perplex,

Should you happen to be a bit curious to see

The place where the nooses are made for your necks,

f you speak of Myles Joyce you must lower your

voice

Or else in Kilmainham your visit will close ;

So when passing that way, in the night or the day,

Just keep one of your hands tightly pressed to your

nose.

Chorus —

Keep a hold of your nose—keep fast hold of your

nose

Upon every road where the ‘‘foxy one” goes;

For when he is out there’s contagion about,

And you should be careful to muffle your nose,

III.

You citizens all, from King’s-bridge to North-wall,

Who always are loyal, determined, and true—

Who cherish a strong recollection of wrong

Which recent occurrences serve to renew—

Keep away from that spot where each murderous plot

To strangle the nation is hatched by her foes ;

It’s neighbourhood shun, or else pass in a run,

And still keep your handkerchief up to your nose,

Chorus—

Keep a hold of your nose—keep fast hold of your

nose—

For the ghosts of its victims are standing in rows,

Pointing each fleshless hand at a foul, filthy band,

_ And the other hand rigidly grasping the nose.

IV.

You broad-shouldered ** B’s” and you crime-sniffing

” G’s”

Who pass every day through those portals of sin,

So stately erect, did you ever ‘‘ detect”

The cauldron of villainy seething within ?

Though for a long time overflowing with crime,

Its odour increases as older it grows,

So be sure ere you pass to let down a stiff glass,

And keep two of your digits at least to your nose,

Chorus—

Keep a hold of your nose—keep fast hold of your

nose—

Imagine it’s one of the empire’s worst foes ;

Hold it tight to your lip with inflexible grip,

For when searching for pantries you’ll want all

your nose, —

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No. 10.

A BUTTERCUP, BY ‘‘ NINETY-EIGHT.”

I.

In the grimy den upon Cork-hill

The English lepers lie ;

They hear in deep, sepulchral tones

Their murdered victims cry. _

They see within the ghost of Joyce,

And watch his dying throes ;

They hear without the people’s shout,

” Pass by and hold your nose.”

Il.

Upon the sights they witness there –

They look with bated breath ;

They see brave men in dungeons bound

And others ” done to death.”

They vainly close their weary eyes,

They vainly seek repose ;

For still they hear the mocking cry,

” Pass by and hold your nose.”

III.

They smoke havannahs, sip their wine,

To drive away their care ;

But still their victims, pale and grim,

Surround them everywhere.

And still the memory of the past

Keeps piling on the woes;

Stentorian voices still call out, |

” Pass by and hold your nose,”

__________________________

No. 11.

A CARNATION, BY “ CLAN RANNAIL.”

I.

Oh ! sure it is a blessed thing

To live in darling Dublin city :

At least it was in days gone by,

But ’tis not now, and more’s the pity.

The Castle—called the seat of ‘‘law

And order”—now the fact discloses,

Is but a sink of vice and sin,

And to all evil predisposes. –

Oh! purest, sweetest Erin dear,

Thy virtue’s light its crime exposes $

Its moral atmosphere’s so foul

That men in passing ‘‘ hold their noses,”

II.

Tis said Augeus, king, of old,

Had stables famed in mythic story :

With thousands three of beasts ’twas stored—

Its dirty state he deemed his glory !

Till Hercules in one short day

Cleared out the reeking, rank enclosure

From all the filth which in it lay

For thirty years in soft composure !

That horrid Castle, mother dear,

Thy virtues’ light its crime exposes ;

Yea, e’en the dogs while running by

Put up their paws against their noses !

III.

Sure ’tis a charnel fetid, dark,

Its ancient rival far outvying,

To our pure land a very curse,

Its hateful scenes to Heav’n outcrying !

Ah! we’ve a Hercules as strong

As he who cleansed the Augean stable—

One worthy of a nation’s love—

And heroes great as those in fable:

They’ll cleanse that stable, mother dear,

From every stain Heaven’s light discloses.

No wonder when they’re walking near

Thy sons look pained and hold their noses.

IV.

Now, brothers all, both great and small,

Give ear unto my humble ditty,

And listen to the warning cry

That’s running through your noble city :

Whene’er you’re bound to pass Cork-hill

Just turn your faces to the Liffey,

And, sisters dear, don’t stop anear,

But shun the Castle in a jiffy :

Rush by as from an open drain

Which every sort of stench discloses,

And raise meanwhile the bold refrain

Of ‘* Hold your noses! hold your noses !”

___________________

No. 12.

A DAISY, BY THE ‘‘ DOORKEEPER OF THE

SOUTHWARK CLUB.”

I.

Come, all ye sons of Granuaile, I hope ye will drav

near

And listen to the simple lines I’ll lay before you here,

Concarnin’ of the Castle crew—the cause of all our

Woes :

Oh! when ye pass that festerin’ mass be sure to hold

_ your nose !

II.

“Tis many a day since o’er the say they came to Erin’s

isle

To crush us with their cursed laws and lure us with

their wile ;

They wrecked and racked, they hewed and hacked, as

well poor Granue knows,

And now her name they drag in shame, and make min

hold their nose.

III.

No friends they made who’d give them aid since first

they landed here,

But scoundrels base that shame our race, from An-

trim to Cape Clear ;

And now, indeed, their dirty breed in deeper evil

grows

Till every hand throughout the land is lifted to the

nose.

IV.

In times gone by snakes had to fly when could Saint

Patrick spoke,

On Clontarf’s plain Brian crushed the Dane and broke

the tyrant yoke,

And, oh! were they alive to day, ’tis bravely they’d

expose |

These sarpents vile who rule our isle and makes us

hold our nose. :

– v.

So now, my frinds, my verses inds ; if I could have my

| way, |

It’s quick’and true this filthy crew we’d hunt across

the say. |

But this I say, God sind this day the curse of all the

crows

On Foxy Jack and all his pack who make us hold our

nose ! “

______________

No. 13.

A PRIMROSE BLOSSOM, SENT BY ‘ SANI-

TARIAN.”

I.

They’re talking of the Liffey’s smell,

Of “dwellings” moaning sadly ;

But sure each “ cit” can plainly tell

‘9 Where cleansing’s wanted badly.

Just walk towards the Castle Yard,

Where ‘‘Jack” betimes reposes ;

But when you’re there be on your guard,

And tightly hold your noses.

Il.

If Jack should go abroad again

T’o take a small vacation,

Petition him, and ask him then

for better sanitation.

And if with phrases bland and sweet

W Before a crowd he poses,

You’ll quickly get him to retreat

By holding tight your noses.

III.

The other day at the hotel

Of cleanness he was telling ;

Before his speech it had been well

If he had cleansed his dwelling.

So if you pass that hateful spot —

Be sure to take some roses ;

And if perchance you have them not,

Walk fast and hold your noses.

___________________

No. 14.

A VIOLET, BY “ T. D.”

I.

Ye that visit or are citizens of Dublin city fair,

Of a castle foul and dangerous I’d have you to beware ;

Tis the plague-spot of our country, and the smell

that from it flows

Is so vile that when you’re near it you had better hold

your nose.

II.

This pestilential castle has its place upon Cork-hill ;

Grim monsters throng its chambers and its vaults and

cellars fill ;

They lap our country’s life-blood, and they fatten on

our woes— :

But you need not fear the creatures if you only hold

your nose.

III.

A. hateful breed of sable rats that came from Eng-

land’s shores

Have taken up their lodgings on the Castle’s slimy

floors,

A nation’s curse lies over it, dishonour in if grows—

If you’d shun its foul miasma when you’re near it hold

your nose.

IV.

It has been the grand promoter of our country’s woe

and strife;

lts bribe of gold oft whetted the assassin’s ready

knife ;

Long has it been the rendezvous of Erin’s crafty

foes

And no one e’er should pass it without holding fast

his nose.

V.

Oh! never, dear old Ireland, can your sons know peace

or rest

Till this plague-producing Castle has been swept from

off your breast :

If the rats and all would leave us when their foxy

keeper goes,

Then need Dublin ring no longer with the cry of

* Hold your nose !”

____________________

No. 15.

A MOSS ROSE, BY ” CABRA.”

I.

Go, get your cats; we’ll hunt the rats

In alleys, lanes, and corners,

Not Irish bred, but Irish fed,

Black, brown, and foxy foreigners.

My brave young men, you’ll know the den

Where this vile brood reposes ;

I need not tell, you’ll get the smell—

So mind you hold your noses.

II.

The Red Buck first, he is the worst,

A. famous one for tearing ;

The next to Bolt in wild revolt,

Has caused a lot of swearing.

The next is French, but mind the stench—

It’s aught but oil of roses ;

You seem to smell the brimstone cell,

So mind you hold your noses,

III.

We’ll soon see fall the Corn(er)wall—

We’ve seen the Pillars tumble ;

Then left and right the rats take fligh€,

With many a squeak and grumble.

Hurroo! they go! there’s tallyho!

Not one behind reposes.

Go, run them down through all the town,

But mind you hold your noses.

__________________________

No. 16.

A FUSCHIA, BY J. MULHERN.

I.

There’s something rotten in the Castle-

What the mischief must it be,

When a neighbour or a stranger

Cannot pass its gateways free

From a loathsome kind of feeling

Caused by gusts of noxious air

Spreading from the gloomy casements

O’er the public thoroughfare ?

Chorus—

Hold your nose and press it tightly

When you near the Castle gates ;

Bide your time and watch it rightly,

Give the wink to all your mates.

II.

There’s something rotten in the Castle ;

Poisonous vapours gather there ;

Noxious odours fast are spreading

From each chamber, hall, and stair.

Lest this new and strange contagion

Should unconscious mortals meet,

Haste to pass some words of warning

To your friends in every street.

Chorus—

Hold your nose and press it tightly

Whene’er you near the Castle gates ;

Bide your time and watch it rightly,

Give the wink to all your mates,

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No. 17.

A SUNFLOWER, BY “J. N.,” KILMORE,

I.

Now “ Hold your nose” is all the rage

When passing by Cork-hill,

For there a fetid spot is seen

That makes one sorely ill.

If travelling nigh that sodden ground,

‘Neath which the Poddle flows—

Where nameless crime pollutes the alr—

I’d have you * hold your nose.”

Let each one this a warning take,

As on through life he goes :

When Dublin Castle meets your view

Just grin and “ hold your nose.

Il.

Pandora’s box of bitter pills,

That vex us on life’s road,

Could not afford such frightful ills

As that corrupt abode. :

Then stigmatise, both one and all,

The spot from whence there rose

Such tainted, foul, mephitic airs

As made you hold your nose.”

Let each one this a warning take,

As on through life he goes :

When Dublin Castle meets your view

Just grin and ‘hold your nose.”

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No.’ 18.

TULIP, BY “ NEPHIN.”

1.

Oh ! the scenery is fair

That delights us every where

As this isle of ours we Views

Famed for worth, and beauty too.

But there 1s to taint its air

Still one pestilential lair :

When from thence the zephyr blows,

Hold your nose, boys—hold your nose !

II.

Dublin Castle foul and fell,

Tile to sight and rank of smell,

How each virtuous sire and son

Strives thy tainted air to shun !

Traveller, make no delay

Tf by the Castle lies your way :

Through its gates what foulness goes —

Hold your nose, boys—hold your nose.

III.

Phoenix Park or Stephen’s-green

How delightful is the scene !

Dublin with its noble stream,

Silvered by the bright sun’s beam,

With its monuments and spires

How each patriot heart it fires

But the Castle comes in view ;

Mark the stench— what shall we do

Why, till out of sight it goes,

Hold your nose, boys—hold your nose !

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No. 19

A BACHELOR’S BUTTON, BY ” THOMOND.”

I.

I’m a simple country gossoon who has lately come to

To see your public buildings of world-wide renown ;

And as Parliament’s not working I hoped to see the a

foes

Of that horrible old nuisance which made me hold my

nose.

iI.

The other day, while gazing on the House in College-

green,

And thinking of poor Erin and the glorious days she’d

seen,

I saw great crowds pass by me—’tis the truth I tell,

dear knows—

They had just passed by the Castle, and each man

held his nose.

III.

For some time I had been wondering why Henry

Grattan stood

With his back towards Dublin Castle—which l thought

was very rude ;

I wondered now no longer, for the smell that from it

rose

Made even bronze King’Billy put his hand up to his

nose !

IV.

I had seen your great museum and old Trinity as

well ;

I then went towards the Castle, but I could not stand !

the smell :

For twas here that John and Georgie—at least so the

story goes—

Tried to hide that nameless horror which made me hold

my nose.

V.

With pity for the bobbies who loitered round the gate, “|

I rushed away like lightning, before ‘twould be too.

late ;

To a druggist’s shop L hurried, for L shivered to the

toes,

And found relief in smelling-salts for my offended

VI.

I very soon recovered, and was just upon my feet.

When Foxy Jack came prancing with his soldiers

through the street.

For “hats off” he looked around him, but the cause of

all our woes

Got his proper salutation—every Paddy held his nose- :

VII.

Now, all you country gossoons, [ll give you some

advice :

If you should come to Dublin, and would still keep

spruce and nice, .

Don’t go near to Dublin Castle, for the smell would.

spoil your clothes,

And should you meet the Red Man put your fingers to

nose your nose.

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No. 20.

A SPRAY OF HONEYSUCKLE, SENT BY JAMES

CAMPBELL.

I.

We daily hear,

With growing, fear,

Of telegrams apprising

The plague’s advance

Through Spain and France,

The sons of men chastising ;

But, friends, a plague

Much worse, more vague,

The fruit of pagan wassail,

Quite near us lurks

And havoc works—

Its hotbed is the Castle.

So hold your noses ;

Remember, health imposes

On all who will

Not shun Cork-hill,

To tightly hold their noses.

Il,

The dread simmoom

‘Mid fearful gloom

Sweeps o’er the desert, sowing

The seeds of death

Unless the breath

Be held while it is blowing.

More baneful still,

More sure to kill, “

Ts that dire exhalation

Which hangs around

The Castle ground—

Cork-hill’s abomination.

Then hold your noses

The scent of all the roses

That ever grew

Were vain for you,

So therefore hold your noses.

III.

Take my advice—

Let nought entice

You o’er the infected border.

Though those within

For ever din

The cry of ‘‘law and order,”

Yet all the time ~

Inhuman crime :

finds there full many a vassal s

Therefore beware,

Don’t breathe the air |

Round French and Cornwall’s castle.

Hold your noses ;

A horror there reposes

Of which a sniff

Would leave you stiff,

So mind and hold your noses.

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No. 21.

A DAFFODIL, BY W. P. RYAN.

I.

Whene’er you roam by old Cork-hill

To hold your nose take care,

Or else you surely will inhale

The smell that rises there.

Oh! filthy rats and reptiles vile

Upon that hill repose ;

So when you pass it on your way

Take care to hold your nose

II.

Though you might roam from day to day

This weary world around,

Not one such vile or filthy place

Could anywhere be found.

The balmy breeze becometh foul

When o’er Cork-hill it blows—

So when you pass the Castle gates

Take care to hold your nose !

III.

How strange that in our lovely isle

So foul a den could be:

Sure, Innisfail was ever famed

For lore and sanctity. :

She knew no filthy Castle rats

Till came our Saxon foes—

Now when you pass that horrid den

Take care to hold your nose !

IV.

But soon the light of liberty

Shall shine upon our isle :

Then from the Castle shall depart

All creatures foul and vile.

The gentle breeze shall then be pure

When past Cork-hill it blows ;

But till that time, when passing by,

Take care to hold your nose !

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No. 22.

AN ASTER, BY BERNARD JAMES DUGGAN, OF

WORKINGTON.

I.

As I sat one evening musing,

With my elbow on my knee,

Methought I heard a whisper,

And a warning came to me ,

To beware of Dublin Castle

And the things that dwell therein,

For there’s nothing decent near it—

Naught but vice and crime and sin.

Just then there came a murmur,

And these solemn words arose, :

When you’re passing the Castle

Be you sure to hold your nose.

Il.

Being curious, out I sallied,

And towards the Castle went,

And I observed some hundred others

In the same direction bent.

Just then I saw the Castle,

And the atmosphere was thick—

Tts effect was so unpleasant

That I soon was feeling sick.

{ essayed to pass the building,

But the odour that arose

Set me very soon retreating

With my hand upon my nose,

III.

I returned then to my chamber

A sadder, wiser man,

And I now would say to others

Take a warning when you can

For if I my own __________

I would ne’er ____________

Which unto t_____________

Leaves me _______________

Still, _____________________

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